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Author Topic: Lathe Buying Guide  (Read 19172 times)

kyo

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Lathe Buying Guide
« on: February 28, 2008, 04:03:56 PM »
Ok, I get this question A LOT.. and a while back I finally just wrote a guide for it.. I finally figured I should share with everyone else.

The question of course is "What do I need, why, and how much does it cost?"

_____

The following is based on the Taig setup, however you can use it as a reference guide for any company/brand etc. as far as what you need. This is the basics, yes, there is a lot more.. but it's a starting point since it's a fairly overwhelming thing to figure out on your own.

______

The following is a list of 'necessary' or useful tools, as found here.. Please note that the prices listed do not include the 10% discount you get on all lathe and accessory items (no discount on motors). This list includes ONLY the absolutely essential parts.

All of these parts came from www.cartertools.com/catalog.html and I highly recommend buying here. Nick, who runs the store has absolutely perfect service and is extremely helpful.

Update: Prices updated as of 2/23/11
______________________

Essential Parts:

L1017 - $191.50 - Micro Lathe II basic unit, assembled. I suggest this because without a familiarity with lathes, the unassembled unit will be more difficult to set up.

1021W - $106.40 - Marathon Motor. This is an awesome motor that can take a lot of abuse. However, almost any motor will due if you care to find one on your own.. they can be found in things like scrap yards, treadmills, etc. and you can find them cheaper.. but this one is great, and you don't have to look for it

1162 - $25.80 - Pulley's and belt. Quite simply, they are what connect the motor to the lathe. Specify that you want the long belt.. as there are 2 different lengths depending on how you set up the lathe.

1023 - $7.70 - Mounting Board. The easiest way to set up the lathe.. it has all the holes pre-drilled all you have to do is follow the setup instructions. You can make your own, but for $7.50 it will save you a lot of trouble.

1022 - $5.25 - Mounting Brackets.. what you attach the motor to.

1050 - $64.10 - 3-Jaw Self Centering Chuck - The workhorse of the lathe, it's what holds all the parts. This is a good general purpose chuck, with soft aluminum jaws that can be shaped to hold whatever odd yo-yo part you need. I use this chuck for probably 85% of my work.

1095 - $28.75 - 6 Piece Bit set. These are the 'basic' lathe tools. 6 different shapes for various cuts and work.. a good starting point for learning. Ideally, you will eventually learn to grind your own bits as needed, but these are a good start.

1310 - $7.50 - easily the most useful tool I have. Allows you to easily remove the chuck.. very simple, but amazingly useful since the slot is so thin.

Total : $437.00
Total after applicable 10% discounts - $403.94

You can save quite a bit on the motor if you find one elsewhere. Pretty much any similar motor with a 1/2" shaft will work.
___________

Useful Extras:

1150 - $39.50 - Drilling Tailstock. This allows you to use the lathe as a drill by mounting a fixed bit onto the bed of the lathe, and spinning the part. (exactly the opposite of a normal drill). This lets you drill holes in parts, tap threads for screws, etc. Very useful.

1051 - $9.00 - Additional blank jaws for the chuck. This gives you a greater flexibility in what you can hold in the lathe. You can cut each set to hold various things. I have probably 9 or 10 sets of these at this point for all the odd things I've had to work on.. all cut to different specifications. These are an add-on and not absolutely necessary, but cheap and nice to have. I'd pick up at least one extra set.

1096 (3x) - $1.95 x 3 = 5.85 - Unground bit blanks. These allow you to grind bits to any shape you need for all kinds of cuts. You just need a bench grinder, easily found at any hardware store for around $30. I personally have 20-30 of these at this point for different cutting operations, but just a few will give you somewhere to start.

1173 - $31.10 - Cut off tool. VERY useful. The most rigid way to cut off parts.. often used for cutting off rings of yo-yos and parting off sections of material.

1090 - $37.80 - Jacob's drill chuck - industrial quality. These are like the drill chucks you find in, well, drills. They mount on the drilling tailstock to hold bits and taps. You can go cheaper and get the 1092, but I prefer this one as it is -really- durable and strong. I find that with the smaller chuck, when you use small bits and taps (common for yo-yos) they tend to flex more and cause problems.

Total: $123.25
Total after 10% discount: $110.93

____________________________________

Non-Taig Items that are great for yo-yo modding.

Threaded rod in various thread sizes. The common ones for yo-yos are 4M (duncan and some Kyo yo-yos), #6 (yoyojam), #8 (many metal yo-yos), and 1/4" (many metal yo-yos) You can often find these at hardware stores, or Fastenal stores (www.fastenal.com) if there is one near you.. or of course online.

Add to that nuts in the appropriate sizes, and some washers, and you can build a "draw-bar" to hold yo-yos. EXTREMELY useful for modding, because holding the curved side of a yo-yo is nearly impossible without building something to thread the axle into.

Basically the threaded rod passes through the headstock of the lathe, into or through the yo-yo and is screwed together on either end.. this holds the part securely against the chuck, and you can tighten the chuck to center it.

And there you have it.. all you ever needed to know.

Kyle
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 08:51:21 PM by kyo »
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afunky9

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2008, 04:19:29 PM »
Wow....

Awesome!!!

Shall it be stickied.. I think so!!!  O0
I think you're one of the worst members I've ever seen on YYN.
Thanks!

xcon203

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2008, 04:26:24 PM »
thanks so much for this. i have been wondering what to get as far as lathes go. O0

LUCCaA.K.A.

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2008, 05:55:35 PM »
thankyou
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icthus

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2008, 08:38:36 PM »
thankyou
Dang. I need a new lathe now. I guess mine is too old.

Colin

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2008, 05:45:04 AM »
Oh snap. I want a lathe now.
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redgrape

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2008, 08:35:44 AM »
many thanks to Kyle for all my questions! this is a really awesome guide. personally i would recommend ordering a second belt, but since i had no clue what i was doing when i set mine up i totally take the blame for snapping it :-)
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 01:37:35 PM by redgrape »

LUCCaA.K.A.

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2008, 12:37:37 PM »
so what else would i have to buy if i got the mini lathe and what disadvantages does it have (it is a mini lathe) can it cut metal and stuff
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Blue

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #8 on: February 29, 2008, 02:18:10 PM »
great and instructive post! A+]



EDIT:   Actually I am curious if I could get pics or a diagram of how the draw-bar actually works, especially with a yo yo which the axle doesn't go straight through (like a metal)

I think I understand, but not fully, because the check has rounded edges and that doesn't seem like it'd hold a threaded rod too well.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 02:56:10 PM by Blue »
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kyo

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #9 on: February 29, 2008, 06:20:10 PM »
The drawbar is not held by the chuck.

The drawbar is basically a way to apply tension to hold the yoyo against the chuck, then the chuck hits the curves of the yoyo and centers it gently.

For yoyos where it doesn't pass through, you simply thread the rod directly into the yoyo just like a super long axle.

[--||<-0--]

where:
[ = nut on one end of the drawbar
---- = threaded rod
|| = headstock
< = chuck
0 = yoyo

the last --] is removed from the equation if you can thread directly into the yoyo.

Kyle
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robtsou

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #10 on: February 29, 2008, 06:27:02 PM »
Drawbar setup.







Rob
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Blue

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #11 on: February 29, 2008, 06:46:41 PM »
Thanks guys! I also did a search and found the answer in another thread by you guys.

The Diagram and pictures made me understand that completely now though.




@Robtsou-  What kind of belt is that, it looks crazy! Also, are those custom shaped chuck Jaws, like Kyo was explaining in his original post?

Do you guys know of any Radius tools that fit on the Taig? When I get mine I'd like to make some custom drawer pulls, and cabinet knobs for my parents new bathroom/kitchen. and would like to do more than half ball ends.  That being said I have seen the 1210  on the website Kyo posted, but  they don't seem too keen on the tool themselves, and the link is broken, and I can't see the redirect while I'm here at work (blocked)

also just going into it I don't see making a homemade one myself working all too well.
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LUCCaA.K.A.

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #12 on: February 29, 2008, 06:47:23 PM »
so what else would i have to buy if i got the mini lathe and what disadvantages does it have (it is a mini lathe) can it cut metal and stuff
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kyo

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2008, 07:11:52 PM »
Dear Rob: screw you and your fancy pictures. :)

Rob's belt is ridiculous.

Yes those are the custom shaped jaws.. they can be made to any size grip you'd like, and any shape/step/etc depending on what you need.

I have never attempted looking for a radius tool for the taig so I can't be much help there.

Lucca: did you actually read that huge post above? You know, the one that describes everything you need? Yes, it can cut metal and stuff, it's a metal lathe.

Kyle
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Blue

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #14 on: February 29, 2008, 07:30:38 PM »
Are you talking about the MicroLathe II, which is the kit that KYO posted?

If so, then I am pretty sure it will cut metal, wood, plastic etc.  and with precision since it is controlled by mechanics and not by hand.
as far as what else to buy, Kyo noted pretty much everything important, including non-neccessity items, and non-directly lathe based items..

Edit: Beaten to the punch by Kyle, but I spent so much time between phone calls at work to type that that I didn't want to abandon it.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 07:32:14 PM by Blue »
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robtsou

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #15 on: February 29, 2008, 07:54:37 PM »
Yes my belt is ridiculous.  It's a link belt. Since I use standard pulleys with a variable speed motor, I can use that belt with whatever pulley combination I need and adjust it's length when I need to.  On the other hand, that belt is never going to break and it supposedly reduces vibration.

Those jaws are custom cut for my preferences.

I also do not have a radius tool but plan on making one for myself sometime in the future.

Rob
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Ricerocket

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #16 on: February 29, 2008, 08:21:13 PM »
HERE is a good picture catalog with most of the accessories that Taig makes.  The website has alot of pictures and descriptions of other people's setups.

I bought my Taig from Hobby Lobby: http://www.hobby-lobby.com/taig.htm but had them price match Nature Coast Hobby HERE.  Nature Coast has a better price, but their customer service wasn't the greatest.  Also Hobby Lobby not only matches, but then cuts 10% more off the difference.
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kyo

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #17 on: February 29, 2008, 08:42:12 PM »
You linked the exact same page that is in the guide.

Taig dealers are supposedly not allowed to go more than 10% below list prices.. if you notice, all of the things I listed I mention there is a 10% discount on that.

Pricing compared to nature coast, there is a $30 difference in price between carter and them for the same package.. and the basic lathe is cheaper at carter. I'd go to nick purely for the service and help he can provide.. I'd gladly pay more for the help he's provided to me and many others. This of course is assuming that nature coast is selling the marathon motor and not subbing for something far cheaper.

Kyle
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Ricerocket

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #18 on: February 29, 2008, 08:52:08 PM »
You linked the exact same page that is in the guide.

Whoops!  So I did.   Sorry Kyle.  The cartertools.com site is a great resource for all things Taig.
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Blue

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Re: Lathe Buying Guide
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2008, 10:33:37 PM »
You linked the exact same page that is in the guide.

Taig dealers are supposedly not allowed to go more than 10% below list prices.. if you notice, all of the things I listed I mention there is a 10% discount on that.

Pricing compared to nature coast, there is a $30 difference in price between carter and them for the same package.. and the basic lathe is cheaper at carter. I'd go to nick purely for the service and help he can provide.. I'd gladly pay more for the help he's provided to me and many others. This of course is assuming that nature coast is selling the marathon motor and not subbing for something far cheaper.

Kyle

When I buy mine I'm going to Carter Tools, for the simple fact that on his Ordering Info page he says "I will always be available for technical help via. e-mail whether you ordered from me or bought it elsewhere." and that says A LOT about the kind of Person he is and care/interest he has in the product.  I work Sales at an Online Music Store and we are told to turn down Tech Support if they didn't buy from us (even if we legitimately know the answer) I usually help anyway.
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